THE WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHERS POSING GUIDE | UNDER THE BRIGHT LIGHTS #23

Capturing those perfect moments with just the Bride & Groom is my all-time favourite part of a Wedding. It takes time, experience and a lot of skill to perfect portraiture in photography and my approach has always been to capture natural & creative photographs of the Bride & Groom. 

Each week I will share one of my Wedding Images, sharing my tips on posing, how to encourage the couple with feedback and prompts and give an overview of my camera settings. 

Remember that each Wedding is different, I have a handful of posing ideas I use, each pose can lead to something different and unique. Capturing a perfect portrait is not always about posing, asking the Bride and Groom to kiss can lead to genuine laughter, that moment can create some of the best photographs of the day. 

Weddings these days happen all year round, weddings only happening during the summer are a thing of the past, and winter weddings can throw up a few challenges you probably wouldn't encounter at a summer wedding. The lack of light becomes an issue during the winter months, especially in the United Kingdom you can expect nightfall to land around 3-4pm, therefore you're going to need to add light. 

An obvious way to add artificial light is using a speedlite/flashgun, for this particular shot of Shelley & Shaun I used my speedlite to add a little fill flash to the image. But one thing I love to do when the night falls is go and find light, honestly it's amazing what you can work with; street lamps, car headlights and even more adventurous things like sparklers. For this shot I knew I could work with the large downward facing lights outside the cricket club, so I positioned the couple under the lit area but ensured they didn't stand directly under the light source so I could avoid harsh spot lighting. Shelley & Shaun kissed whilst I was taking a few shots so I asked them to continue, when you see something lovely unfolding in front of the camera don't be afraid to ask for more. Rather than re pose them you can then concentrate on capturing the shot from different perspectives.